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Viewing 9751 to 9780 of 10150
2008-06-30
Article
Eclipse Aviation says its Eclipse 500 was built upon the principle of a total product lifecycle management approach combining mechanical, electronic, electrical, and manufacturing disciplines. The integration of subsystems into a final wire harness was key, this being the “living neurological system” of the aircraft, controlling all electrical and electronic signals to all essential systems.
2008-06-30
Article
he use of alternative, environmentally compatible power sources for aircraft is moving ahead cautiously. Although full details have not been released, Airbus has confirmed that it had successfully flight-tested a fuel-cell system in an A320 to power backup hydraulic and electric power systems.
2008-06-30
Article
3-D woven preforms offer a low-cost method of manufacturing composites with high through-thickness thermal conductivity without an attendant loss of strength or stiffness.
2008-06-30
Article
With a surface composed of tightly packed nanostructures that resemble tiny nails, thus the term “nanonails,” University of Wisconsin–Madison engineers and their colleagues from Bell Laboratories have created a material that can repel almost any liquid. But with a jolt of electricity, the liquid on the surface slips past the heads of the nanonails and spreads out between their shanks, wetting the surface completely.
2008-06-30
Article
Lufthansa Technik is responsible for keeping the Lufthansa fleet in shape. It was facing a huge challenge due to required fuselage inspections of all Boeing 737s prescribed by Boeing as a consequence of the “Aloha” accident in 1998.
2008-06-30
Article
When a new aerospace material is being developed, the companies or organizations involved must always consider the tooling that will be necessary to see it into production. Belgian tooling specialist Elsyca claims that its newly announced tooling design service for companies involved in coating and plating parts­ can provide up to a 30% reduction in lead times, a 20% reduction in materials wastage, and a 10% reduction in manpower.
2008-06-30
Article
Sandvik Coromant’s cooling system for high-pressure coolant applications solves chip removal and swarf control problems, supports higher speed cutting data, and increases productivity.
2008-06-30
Article
Vought Aircraft Industries has secured another contract to supply Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. with Black Hawk helicopter cabin structures. Under the preceding contract with Sikorsky, assembly work on the cabin structure for the newest Black Hawk variant, the UH-60M, began last year at Vought’s 5.4 million-ft2 Jefferson Street plant in Dallas, where it also builds tail sections, wings, and other major components for a variety of aircraft makers.
2008-06-30
Article
The Hexagon Loxham Precision Laboratory, a new facility designed for leading-edge ultra precision research, has been opened at Cranfield University in the U.K. Cranfield has strong links with aerospace technology, and the laboratory will aid significant research into the manufacture of mirrors for the NASA James Webb Space Telescope and will also help scientists develop technologies for finding Earth-like planets and forms of life in space.
2008-06-30
Article
Cessna unveiled a proof-of-concept of a light sport aircraft (LSA) in July 2006 and announced one year later that it would proceed with development of the aircraft, which was named the SkyCatcher. The aluminum aircraft is being designed to meet American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard F2245 for the light sport category.
2008-06-30
Article
For the average person, what constitutes a hot day is subjective. The same with a cold day. For aerospace engineers, though, it’s not subjective—and there’s a new SAE standard to prove it. The S-15 Gas Turbine Performance Simulation Nomenclature and Interfaces Committee recently published ARP210, “Definition of Commonly Used Day Types (Atmospheric Ambient Temperature Characteristics Versus Pressure Altitude).”
2008-06-30
Article
Ever wonder whether a diesel engine can be used to power a helicopter? Or if you can safely attach a 1-ton spray pod to a passenger turboprop plane with a cruising speed of 284 mph? These are not the typical subjects of aviation feasibility studies, but they are practically meat-and-potatoes for Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Applied Engineering Research Center (AERC) in Daytona Beach, FL.
2008-06-30
Article
A variety of manufacturers have successfully shown how small, tactical, relatively low-cost UAVs can provide soldiers and marines on the ground with timely data on enemy positions. One of the keys to such programs is not the electro-optic/IR sensors through which data is collected, but the autonomous control systems that make such systems operable.
2008-06-30
Article
ASB Avionics uses dual Ametek engine interface units (EIUs) to transform analog engine sensor data into a digital format for its engine instrument display (EID) system, approved by the FAA for the L382G (civilian version of the C-130H) cargo aircraft.
2008-06-30
Article
Ball Aerospace & Technologies has completed the precision coating process of the primary mirror for NASA’s Kepler Mission, a mission that is specifically designed to detect Earth-size and smaller planets near stars within our region of the Milky Way galaxy.
2008-06-30
Article
Quatro Composites, a designer and manufacturer of carbon-fiber molded products, has been awarded three contracts to supply carbon-fiber panels to airframers and Tier 1 suppliers for drill qualification and assembly training.
2008-06-30
Article
Meeting safety requirements in all aspects of aerospace production and engineering demands high levels of expertise. Now, specialist technology company 3M has developed what it believes to be the world’s first two-part structural epoxy adhesive to meet aerospace fire, smoke, and toxicity (FST) standards (when tested stand-alone) without the need for additional treatments or surface coatings.
2008-06-30
Article
Boeing announced another three-month delay—from the end of the first quarter in 2008 to the end of second quarter—for the first 787 flight. Boeing is pushing back first delivery from late 2008 to early 2009.
2008-06-30
Article
Scorpius Space Launch Co. (SSLC) is capitalizing on—and contributing to—a growing trend in the aerospace industry: the increasing use of composite materials in place of more traditional metals. One has to look no further than the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, which according to market research company Lucintel uses about 50% composites by structural weight, as evidence.
2008-06-30
Article
Purdue University engineers have been using an on-site wind tunnel to conduct experiments aimed at yielding critical data for the design of the X-51A test vehicle.
2008-06-30
Article
Machine tool makers, software developers, and companies involved in other facets of manufacturing are gearing up for the Westec show later this month in Los Angeles.
2008-06-30
Article
The world’s largest titanium producer, VSMPO-Avisma, has ordered four three-spindle MAG Cincinnati Ti (titanium) profilers for its plant in Verkhnaya Salda, Russia. The three-spindle machines will be used to produce several parts, including large landing gear components, for Airbus and Boeing aircraft.
2008-06-30
Article
Delivering ahead of schedule, GKN Aerospace recently supplied Aviation Partners Boeing (APB) with the first blended winglets for the Boeing 737-300/500. Under a multi-year agreement finalized in April 2007, GKN is to deliver 200 737-300/500 blended winglet aircraft sets over several years.
2008-06-30
Article
Lockheed Martin is drawing upon its experience in the practical use of advanced metals to make a number of significant improvements to the manufacturability and supportability of its three most important aircraft: the C-130J, F-22, and F-35.
2008-06-30
Article
MPC Products, headquartered in Skokie, IL, is completing the final testing phase on a NASA project to develop an actuator control system that will mechanically operate a cavity door drive system for what is considered to be the largest telescope to ever to be placed in an aircraft.
2008-06-30
Article
Most people are familiar with the expression, “Trying to build a better mousetrap,” and yet no one has really been able to do it. What we tend to see, more often than not, is that an invention’s design principles serve as the basis to take that invention into new realms of possibilities and technological advancements.
2008-06-30
Article
Alenia Aeronautica had the first flight of its new-generation Sky-Y UAV in 2007. A particularly important aspect of its development program concerns verification of the use of the engine and of its carbon-fiber structure. It is Alenia’s first in the MALE (medium-altitude, long-endurance) category to be conceived, designed, and built in less than a year.
2008-06-30
Article
Very large aircraft do not necessarily have to impose high noise levels on the environment, a fact that has been demonstrated by the Airbus A380’s appearance at international air shows and during its world tours. Now, Airbus is claiming its A380 as the quietest long-range aircraft in service. The aircraft has received external noise levels validation from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the U.S. FAA.
2008-06-30
Article
Commercial aircraft livery is an important part of marketing as well as providing protection for the structure of an aircraft. Akzo Nobel Aerospace Coatings (ANAC) has established a new facility to provide guided color expertise to livery and help operators create airline liveries more quickly.
2008-06-30
Article
BAE Systems will be using Mercury Computer Systems’ VistaNav technology for a rotorcraft brownout landing system. The patent-pending Synthetic Vision with Real-Time Terrain Morphing Engine incorporates terrain sensor measurements that are captured and updated in real time via a standard interface and displayed with Synthetic Vision.
Viewing 9751 to 9780 of 10150