Finite-element modeling software

  • 21-Dec-2010 08:48 EST
Silverado NCAP Frontal Impact_graph_model2.jpg

ETA offers the R1 update of its finite-element modeling software, PreSys. This update delivers new features that enhance the software’s ability to quickly and efficiently create complex simulation models and visualize simulations results. Interfacing with CAD software products such as CATIA, Unigraphics, Pro/ENGINEER, SolidWorks, and AutoCAD, the cost-effective PreSys allows product development engineers and simulation specialists to access design data and quickly create simulation models. The software’s toolset features the ability to create a wide variety of insightful simulations, including durability, vibration, crashworthiness, and fluid-structure interaction models. It interfaces seamlessly with LS-DYNA, MSC/NASTRAN, NX NASTRAN, and NEI NASTRAN. In addition to the model creation tools, PreSys provides users with complete results visualization and reporting capabilities. Users can create detailed images of simulation results, communicating important details regarding the product’s behavior under simulated loadings. Also, users can examine graphs of various simulation results, comparing the results of various simulations.

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