Gradall Industries' XL 5300 III is the largest of its excavators

  • 18-Jan-2010 03:01 EST
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Because the Gradall XL 5300 III boom tilts and telescopes, there is no loss of power through the entire dig cycle as it positions buckets, grapples, hammers, and other attachments for high-production excavating, demolition, trenching, pavement removal, and material loading and unloading with trucks.

Gradall Industries says that the unique design, including front-axle oscillation locks, of its new XL 5300 III wheeled excavator allows it to lift from the front, rear, or either side of the carrier without the need to lower outriggers or the optional front blade. Operators have the option to use outriggers for very big loads.

Because the entire new model's boom tilts and telescopes, there is no loss of power through the entire dig cycle as it positions buckets, grapples, hammers, and other attachments for high-production excavating, demolition, trenching, pavement removal, and material loading and unloading with trucks. Joysticks are used to control all boom movements.

Inexperienced operators can become more comfortable with this model fast, says Gradall, due to a switch that provides an adjustable joystick pattern system, with a choice of SAE, Deere, or Gradall control patterns. The joysticks are mounted on arm pods and are independently adjustable for individual operator comfort.

The carrier and upperstucture cab is designed with sound-deadening features that can reduce operator fatigue while increasing efficiency. An all-weather cab design with a variety of features is available with the XL 5300 III, including air-conditioning, removable front window, AM/FM radio, filtered fresh air heater, defroster, and a large adjustable seating module. A standard “bucket shake” mode, controlled with a joystick button, allows operators to more evenly distribute fill dirt and rip-rap.

When the carrier is being moved around a job site, the telescoping boom and attachment can be raised out of the line of vision. According to Gradall, many conventional excavator booms remain in front of the carrier, blocking vision, and cannot be raised because of overhead clearance requirements.

Detroit Diesel engine delivers 173 hp (129 kW) to the upperstructure as well as the carrier. The chassis features the new Series III counterweight design that creates a shorter tail swing—a big plus when working in tight quarters or along highways. But even with a compact counterweight design, the machine's working boom can reach to 33.8 ft (10.3 m) and digging depth of 24.6 ft (7.5 m).

The four-wheel-drive undercarriage has rubber tires and is sure-footed like a conventional crawler, designed for mobility on rough terrain as well as on highways, but will not damage paved surfaces. Even while the machine is moving, the operator can change between standard and creeper travel mode to efficiently position the machine. Axles are equipped with internal wet-disc type service and parking brakes.

All Gradall Series III excavators have around 70% parts commonality, simplifying the task of maintaining inventories to complete common service functions. Series III machines also have longer routine service intervals, and most service locations can be reached from ground level. A network of authorized distributors supports all Gradall excavators, supplying service advice and authorized Gradall parts.

The XL 5300 III has an operating weight of 51,216 lb (23,231 kg) with a maximum lift capacity of 13,508 lb (6217 kg). Rated boom force is 24,941 lb (111 kN) while bucket breakout force is rated at 25,405 lb (113 kN).

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