Pedestrian headforms

  • 24-Jun-2017 11:53 EDT
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Used for pedestrian safety testing, Diversified Technical Systems’ (Seal Beach, CA) pedestrian headforms (which emulate a human head) embedded data acquisition solution are instrumented with a triaxial accelerometer and miniature SLICE NANO data recorder inside and then launched at a vehicle’s hood and windshield to test for potential injuries that may be sustained by pedestrians. DTS' three-channel SLICE NANO miniature data recorder with 16 GB flash memory offers a cable-free solution for both the 4.5 kg (9.9 lb) “adult” and the 3.5 kg (7.7 lb) “child” headform. The mounting block also houses a DTS ACC3 PRO triaxial accelerometer, which has a mass of 2000 g (70 oz), that measures the linear acceleration and impact forces. Options are also available for other sensor models. “The DAS and sensors are all inside so there are no cables to get tangled up when it’s launched at the car. That also helps with repeatability—something that’s especially important for regulation testing,” said Scott Pruitt, DTS president and co-founder.

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