Lightweight CV joint system

  • 07-Mar-2016 09:53 EST
VL3 Cut.jpg

GKN Driveline has developed a family of lightweight constant velocity (CV) joint systems that enables rear-wheel drive platforms to save more than 4 kg. The VL3 CV joint increases torque capacity by up to 27% with no increase in packaging size. Available in four sizes, the VL3-33ISM variant has a torque capacity of 3300 N∙m in a package previously capable of delivering only 2600 N∙m. The system can also maintain performance while reducing package size by approximately 7%. With a plunging distance of 18 mm, the VL3 is the best choice for a rear constant velocity sideshaft for medium working angles with low axial forces and best in class minimum backlash. It uses a Monobloc tubular shaft and face spline connection to the wheel hub to achieve significant packaging and weight advantages as well as noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) behavior benefits. The VL3 Monobloc joint uses a track geometry with four pairs of opposed ball tracks instead of three, which enables it to transmit more torque to wheels within the same packaging space. The VL3 joint has been selected by BMW to launch on its 7 Series. For more information, visit www.gkndriveline.com.

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