Additive-manufacturing alloys

  • 24-Mar-2015 09:49 EDT
NanoSteel AM impeller.jpg

NanoSteel expands its additive manufacturing (AM) material capabilities to support metal 3-D printing of complex high-hardness parts and to customize properties through gradient material design. By delivering dense, crack-free functional parts with increased hardness levels, NanoSteel develops metal powders that enable on-demand industrial components produced through 3-D printing. High hardness and ductile alloys create gradient design parts for seamless transition without heat treatment. The designs offer digital case hardening and deliver impact resistance and robustness as well as wear resistance for improved flexibility. Other benefits include on-demand availability, reduced inventory, and lower transportation costs. Metal alloys supporting 3-D part printing could accelerate the transition from subtractive to additive manufacturing across applications such as wear parts, bearings, and cutting tools, according to the company. (Read full article at http://articles.sae.org/13971/.)

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