Northrop Grumman chosen to develop AESA technology for DARPA

  • 24-Sep-2014 10:30 EDT
AESA6.jpg

The newest configuration of the F-16 Fighting Falcon, the F-16V, has integrated a new active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, the Scalable Agile Beam Radar (SABR). (Northrop Grumman)

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) selected Northrop Grumman to develop and demonstrate advanced wideband digital antenna technology for next generation radio frequency sensors using active electronically scanned arrays (AESAs). The DARPA Microsystems Technology Office awarded Northrop Grumman an $11.9 million contract for phase one of the Arrays on Commercial Timescales (ACT) program. The purpose of ACT is to develop the key technologies for affordable, next-generation AESAs by designing a reusable digital common module that contains the critical integrated circuits required for next-generation AESAs. ACT aims to greatly reduce the development and manufacturing cost of future digital arrays through common module reuse, high levels of integration, and the application of high-volume commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit technology. Key subcontractors on the Northrop Grumman ACT team are Semtech and Systems & Technology Research.

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