Eaton opens sixth China tech center

Image: Eaton_Chairman_and_CEO_Sandy_Cutler.jpg

Eaton Chairman and CEO Sandy Cutler speaking at the recent dedication ceremony for the new Vehicle Group Asia Pacific Technical Center in Shanghai.

Shanghai is the location of Eaton's latest technical center in China. The new $3.3 million Vehicle Group Asia Pacific Technical Center will develop vehicle powertrain solutions for the Chinese and regional markets, according to the company. Featuring seven "major" labs, the 1200-m² (13,000-ft²) facility will further strengthen Eaton's local testing and development resources pertaining to new engine platforms. The new facility is Eaton's sixth R&D and engineering center in China, including a global corporate research and technology center in Shanghai. The company also has engaged Chinese universities and research institutes for R&D projects and to help cultivate local talent. Eaton began its operations in China in 1993 with a manufacturing facility. Since then it has expanded its presence to include 28 manufacturing facilities and more than 18,000 employees. Eaton has set a sales target of $2 billion in China for 2015.

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