Wyle to provide engineering analyses for USAF Institute of Technology

  • 17-Jun-2013 11:00 EDT

Wyle has been awarded a contract worth $4.6 million to provide engineering analyses for the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology's Department of Systems Engineering and Management located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, OH. Wyle will focus on cost factors influencing the life-cycle cost of military aircraft systems that utilize composite materials. The Air Force has set composites affordability as a critical initiative, and one key Wyle research area includes delamination as a mode of failure in composites materials. The company also will assess operation and support/sustainment strategies based on projected system and subsystem reliability including analysis of data such as meantime between repair, meantime between failure rates, and level of availability. Wyle experts will use this data to provide detailed investigations and analyses to address reliability, modes and patterns, safety/risk areas, and support issues such as parts obsolescence and training.


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