Fluid coupling

  • 14-May-2013 06:48 EDT
Voith TurboBelt 780TPXL.jpg

 

Developed especially for the drives on open-pit mining belt conveyors, the latest fluid coupling technology from Voith features an XL blade wheel profile and transmits twice the power than previous couplings of similar size. The TurboBelt 780 TPXL coupling is designed for 6- and 8-pole induction motors operating at speeds of 900 to 1200 rpm. Start-up with precisely controlled introduction of torque not only protects the belt, but also the entire driveline. Start-up times of up to several minutes can be individually set in the control system. When combined with reliable mechanics, the hydrodynamic TurboBelt 780 TPXL coupling can provide extremely high system availability of up to 99.8%. Maintenance efforts can be reduced because the hydrodynamic power transmission is completely wear-free. Compared with traditional couplings, the TurboBelt 780 TPXL requires only half as much installation space and is also said to be significantly lighter.

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