New EIA data shows why gasoline is the U.S. benchmark motor fuel

  • 15-Feb-2013 02:55 EST
Energy Information Agency.jpg

The data points represent the energy content per unit volume or weight of the fuels themselves, not including the storage tanks or other equipment that the fuels require. For example, compressed-gaseous fuels require heavy storage tanks, while cooled fuels require equipment to maintain low temperature.

On an equivalent energy basis, motor gasoline (which contains up to 10% ethanol) was estimated to account for 99% of U.S. light-duty vehicle fuel consumption in 2012, according to new information released on the U.S. Energy Information Administration website. Over half of the remaining 1% was from diesel; all other fuels combined for less than half of 1%, according to the EIA. The widespread use of these fuels is largely explained by their energy density and ease of onboard storage, as no other fuels provide more energy within a given unit of volume. Compared to gasoline and diesel, other options may have more energy per unit weight, but none have more energy per unit volume.

Share
HTML for Linking to Page
Page URL
Grade
Rate It
3.80 Avg. Rating

Read More Articles On

2018-01-26
In Washington, DC, at the 2018 SAE Government/Industry meeting this week, cellular-communications giant AT&T affirmed in a session on connected-vehicle technology that it will launch ultra-fast mobile 5G service in limited areas sometime late this year.

Related Items

Technical Paper / Journal Article
2011-05-17
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2011-05-17
Training / Education
2011-04-12
Standard
2002-10-25
X