Motor controller for electric and hybrid vehicles

Image: TM4 CO150 motor controller.jpg

Using Reflex gate driver technology, TM4’s CO150 motor controller for electric and hybrid vehicles enables improved current densities. Combining various hardware and software innovations, the technology anticipates a voltage peak on the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) and ensures it never reaches the voltage limit. An active mechanism uses the stray inductance of the IGBT to control the current during the turn-off process without slowing down the rate of voltage change. Only active when needed, the mechanism has virtually no negative effect on efficiency and temperature. Using Infineion HybridPACK2, TM4 designs and manufactures the CO150 motor controller as part of its MOTIVE B electric and hybrid powertrain system; the controller also has been adapted to third-party motors and generators for use in various automotive, commercial vehicle, and motorsport applications.

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