Clean two-stroke engine

Image: Primavis_Engine_Section.jpg

Primavis S.r.l.'s clean two-stroke engine is suitable for propulsion (motorcycles, ATV, small cars, aircraft, industrial, and marine), for auxiliary power units (range extender for electric vehicles and aircraft), and for co-geneneration (combined heat and power). Based on Patent WO/2011/101878, the Primavis solution is related to a two-stroke engine that features high efficiency, high specific power, compact dimensions, low weight, simplicity, low production costs, and low noise and vibration levels. The engine offers one combustion process every crankshaft revolution (modern two-stroke) and air supply realized by an external volumetric pump with balancing function and the possibility of supercharging in combination with a special rotary valve, called CCD (control charge device). It also features a high-pressure direct-fuel-injection system, “four-stroke-like” lubrication system (lubrication oil not mixed with fuel and not burned during the combustion process), liquid cooling, and the possibility of internal exhaust gas recirculation. In addition, it offers the possibility of functioning with several fuels (gasoline, CNG, LPG, and diesel.) More information is available at www.primavis.eu.

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