U.S. Army tabs AVL and Achates Power for new-generation engine

    .
  • Image: Achates Power, Inc. - Engine in Test Cell - Lower Res.jpg
Image: Achates Power, Inc. - A48 Engine (High Res).jpg

Achates Power claims its current base engine technology achieves less than 0.1% fuel-specific oil consumption, with low heat rejection and packaging benefits compared with current-generation diesels.

The U.S. Army’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) has awarded a $4.9 million contract to AVL Engineering and Achates Power Inc. to design and build a demonstrator engine as part of the military's Next-Generation Engine program intended for a wide range of combat and tactical vehicles. In its contract proposal, AVL said the engine would be based on Achates’ opposed-piston two-stroke technology. It will be multi-fuel-capable, per TARDEC's requirements. In developing its base engine technology, Achates has accumulated more than 3600 h of dynamometer testing, achieving 47.5% brake thermal efficiency, the company claims. The advantages demonstrated thus far are published in SAE International technical paper 2011-01-2216 and include leaner, faster, and earlier combustion and greater package efficiency, compared with current-generation diesels. AVL and Achates expect the engine's final design phase to be underway "over the next few years."

Share
HTML for Linking to Page
Page URL
Grade
Rate It
4.50 Avg. Rating

Read More Articles On

2014-10-07
Revealed at the 2014 Paris Motor Show, the concept is based on the XL1 but gets performance touches such as the powerful Ducati V2 engine and a racing-inspired chassis.
2014-04-24
A recent EPA analysis shows that of the MY2014 offerings, 34% already meet 2016 GHG and CAFE targets.
2014-04-25
Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) used the SAE 2014 World Congress April 8 to announce formation of two consortia, one on fuels and lubricants, the other on emissions and catalysts. Sharing costs through a consortium gives companies access to more research than would be feasible fi funded individually, said Thomas Briggs, Ph.D., a Manager in the Engine Systems Research and Development section in the Engine, Emissions, and Vehicle Research Division.
2014-02-17
The four-year, $15 million development program with UW-Madison and Wayne State University aims to achieve diesel levels of efficiency and torque, with lower emissions and cost—in an advanced gasoline-fueled engine.

Related Items

Book
2014-01-21
Book
2006-12-05
Book
2009-08-04
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2004-03-08
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2004-03-08