Subscription-based model fuel library

Image: MFLchart.jpg

Reaction Design’s Model Fuel Library is a subscription-based library that includes more than 40 fully validated, self-consistent components that can be used to simulate fuel effects in virtually all types of automotive and aircraft engines, as well as engines used for electric power generation. The Model Fuel Library’s components can be combined to model a large variety of new or existing fuel blends. According to Reaction Design, it provides a set of accurate models for real-fuel components that enables engine designers to develop low-emission, high-efficiency engines in a more timely and cost-effective manner. Subscribers also will have the ability to target a fuel model for specific application and simulation goals, such as ignition, flame propagation, or emissions of NOx, CO, and soot/particulate matter emissions rates. The Model Fuel Library is a result of seven years of research and validation under the Model Fuels Consortium, whose members include Toyota, GE Energy, VW, and Suzuki

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