Li-ion battery monitor chipset

  • 09-Nov-2012 04:02 EST
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Toshiba America Electronic Component’s lithium-ion battery monitor chipset includes what the company claims is the industry’s first battery monitor integrated circuit (IC) capable of checking up to 16 cells per IC, which simplifies design and lowers costs by reducing the number of components. The chipset is suitable for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEV) and electric vehicles (EV). It comprises the TB9141FG 16-channel battery monitor IC and the TMPM358FDTFG automotive safety microcontroller. The chipset detects remaining battery levels, equalizes charging among the cells in a battery pack (cell balancing), and can also detect abnormal battery conditions. The TMPM358FDTFG is a 32-bit RISC microcontroller built around an ARM Cortex-M3 core and is compliant with functional safety standards such as IEC61508/ISO26262.

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