Motorcycle racing engine design book

  • 01-Nov-2012 02:16 EDT
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Engine Design Concepts for World Championship Grand Prix Motorcycles, published by SAE International, takes readers inside engines of World Championship Grand Prix motorcycles, detailing the design concepts that make them work. Developed especially for racing enthusiasts, the book focuses on the design of four-stroke engines for the MotoGP class. The book opens with general background on MotoGP governing bodies and a history of the event’s classes since the competition began in 1949. It then presents some of the key engines that have been developed and used for the competition through the years. Technologies that are used in today’s MotoGP engines are discussed. The majority of the book consists of SAE International technical papers that were chosen by Alberto Boretti to provide greater insight to the relationships between engine parameters and performance.

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