Eaton, NREL team to reduce hybrid-electric-vehicle battery size

  • 31-Aug-2012 11:14 EDT
hybrid schematic.jpg

Using advanced physics-based battery models developed in partnership with NREL, the hybrid vehicle supervisory controller dynamically balances fuel economy and the health of the downsized battery pack.

Eaton Corp. is developing a power control system for hybrid-electric vehicles (from passenger cars to commercial vehicles) with the goal of reducing by 50% the size of the battery needed. The company on Aug. 27 announced that the work is part of a $2.8 million project funded jointly by Eaton and the U.S. Department of Energy, the latter of which is contributing $2 million. The project is being led by Eaton's Innovation Center team in Southfield, MI, which will work with a team from the DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)—the former offering expertise in intelligent power management and the latter expertise in battery modeling and prognostics. Specifically, the project aims to significantly downsize the battery through a combination of duty-cycle learning and model-based supervisory optimal control design. Using advanced physics-based battery models developed in partnership with NREL, the hybrid vehicle supervisory controller dynamically balances fuel economy and the health of the downsized battery pack to maximize vehicle performance while minimizing the impact on battery life.

Share
HTML for Linking to Page
Page URL
Grade
Rate It
4.18 Avg. Rating

Read More Articles On

2015-09-01
FCA powertrain engineers have shaved weight and increased the efficiency and power of their do-it-all V6, while preparing it for possible DI turbocharged duty in the not-so-distant future.
2015-09-09
A Schaeffler-developed electric powertrain faces the grueling demands of motorsports competition during the upcoming second season of FIA Formula E racing.
2015-09-30
Combining a DPF with an SCR catalyst into one device will enable the faster light-off times required by the more stringent new regs due in Sept. 2017.
2015-10-09
Volkswagen will pay billions in penalties for rigging 11 million diesel cars to skirt emission standards. Unfortunately, the industry hasn't learned from its past mistakes. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Senior Editor Lindsay Brooke looks at VW's recent digital fraud. 

Related Items

Technical Paper / Journal Article
2003-10-27
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2003-10-27
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2003-10-27
Training / Education
2010-03-15