No one gets the cold shoulder with Autoliv's two-point seatbelt

  • 09-May-2012 02:28 EDT
Autoliv 2-point seatbelt.jpg

Autoliv's two-point belt debuts in the tiny Renault Twizy, which has only one front seat.

A seatbelt innovation from Autoliv covers the shoulder that is unprotected in the conventional three-point belt. The company's vertically oriented two-point belt supplements the three-point, the latter of which is very effective in frontal crashes but less so in other types such as side-impact, rollover, and crashes in which the vehicle rotates. The two-point is helpful in those types of crashes but has value in frontal ones as well, Autoliv says, by helping better distribute chest impact forces. The company claims that tests show the two-point reduces the risk of severe injuries and fatalities by approximately 30%. Autoliv further claims that the benefits of the alternative system providing protection to both shoulders—the four-point belt—are lost because some drivers find the inconvenience of using two hands to buckle reason for not using it at all. There is no buckling with the two-point, which is fixed at both ends and requires the seat occupant to merely slide a shoulder under it.

Share
HTML for Linking to Page
Page URL
Grade
Rate It
3.57 Avg. Rating

Read More Articles On

2016-08-25
Volvo and Uber executives provide insights into their collaboration to develop next generation autonomous driving (AD) cars aimed at reaching full SAE Level-5 standard.
2016-11-13
Focused on the near-term safety-improvement potential underlying autonomous-driving technology, Toyota - counter to much of the auto industry - sees real promise in developing SAE Level 2-3 systems.
2016-11-15
Connectivity spawns need for security designed-in from the beginning, a complex issue that spans many disciplines.
2016-11-28
If there’s any doubt that connectivity is the next wave for advanced features and functions, it should dissipate after CES 2017. A multitude of advances in over the air updates and security will be shown in Las Vegas in January, setting the stage for much of the auto industry’s technology rollouts throughout the year.

Related Items

Book
2007-04-23
Training / Education
2010-03-15