Bosch, Autonet Mobile bring Internet apps into the vehicle

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Autonet Mobile says its new telematics control system enables any automotive manufacturer to connect their cars to high-speed mobile networks and deliver new features that enable pervasive cloud computing, mobile apps, and fleet telematics.

Autonet Mobile, a provider of applications and connectivity platforms for vehicles, has entered into a strategic partnership with Bosch's Car Multimedia Division on an Internet-Protocol-based telematics control unit (TCU). Autonet Mobile's automotive-grade device is built to be factory-installed and to access the vehicle's CAN (controller area network) bus to drive the development of in-vehicle applications including key fob, parental control, and fleet offerings. The product allows automotive manufacturers to drive new revenue streams from their vehicles by offering services such as the ability to connect the car to smart phones; parking and toll applications; and vehicle diagnostics. "Partnering with Autonet Mobile provides a massive market opportunity to bring Internet apps into the vehicle," said Juergen Peters, Regional President, Car Multimedia North America, Robert Bosch LLC. "Together, we're enabling a whole world of applications that communicate with systems throughout the car—including the head unit, sensor networks, and instrument clusters—to enhance the driving experience."

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