Deere follows its T4F technology path

  • 11-Apr-2012 06:51 EDT
PSS_9.0L_FT4_Engine_Integrated Emissions Control system.jpg

The John Deere Integrated Emissions Control system will typically consist of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), diesel particulate filter (DPF), and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system specifically designed to meet the demands of rigorous off-highway applications.

To meet Tier 4 Final/Stage IV emissions regulations in some power categories, John Deere developed the Integrated Emissions Control system—an optimized aftertreatment solution paired with its fuel-efficient Tier 4 Interim/Stage III B engine platform, featuring proven cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). The Integrated Emissions Control system will typically consist of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), diesel particulate filter (DPF), and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system specifically designed for rigorous off-highway applications.

Deere says the Integrated Emissions Control system will allow its engines to use less diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) than other T4I/Stage III B SCR technology solutions. Lower DEF consumption means DEF tank size can be smaller—minimizing the impact on vehicle applications, extending DEF filter service intervals, and reducing operator involvement. Monitored and controlled by proprietary electronics within the ECU, the Integrated Emissions Control system contributes to enhanced fluid efficiency without sacrificing overall performance.

As it has done in the past with previous tiers, Deere's T4F/Stage IV technology solution has been designed to consider overall performance and operating efficiency, which takes into account total fluid consumption including diesel fuel and additional fluids such as diesel exhaust fluid (DEF). Deere T4F/Stage IV engines will operate efficiently with traditional ultra low-sulfur diesel as well as biodiesel 5 to 20% (B5-B20) blends meeting applicable ASTM standards.

T4F/Stage IV regulations for off-highway diesel engines begin as early as 2013 for engines 55 kW (74 hp) and below. Regulatory dates for engines 56 kW (75 hp) and above will be implemented in stages starting in 2014 and 2015, and require PM levels established by T4I/Stage III B regulations to be maintained while requiring an additional 80% reduction in NOx from previous regulations. 

Deere says it will tailor its Integrated Emissions Control system to fit a variety of off-highway applications.

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