South Korean airline selects Honeywell avionics suite for new Boeing fleet

  • 20-Feb-2012 12:50 EST

Honeywell's IntuVue 3-D provides pilots with a more complete picture of weather conditions.

Jeju Air, the fastest-growing low-cost carrier (LCC) in South Korea, selected Honeywell Aerospace to provide a full suite of avionics for its new fleet of Boeing 737-800 NG passenger aircraft. This contract covers six aircraft that are expected to be delivered between 2013 and 2017. Jeju Air will be the first LCC in North Asia to fly Boeing 737 NG aircraft with Honeywell's full avionics suite. The Honeywell avionics solutions selected by Jeju Air include Quantum Line communications/navigation sensors, next-generation Airborne Collision Avoidance System (ACAS II), Flight Data Acquisition and Management System (FDAMS), and IntuVue 3-D Weather Radar. IntuVue 3-D has demonstrated a 50% reduction in turbulence-related incidents, can save Jeju Air up to 30% in maintenance costs, and is 25% lighter compared with competing radars. ACAS II provides a display of surrounding aircraft and alerts the flight crew if another aircraft comes too close for safety. Solid-state data and voice recorders record flight data parameters and cockpit voice conversation for analysis.

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