Boeing to build more Wideband Global SATCOM Satellites for USAF

  • 24-Jan-2012 01:23 EST
SEF11-08083-003_satellite_retouched.jpg

WGS-4, WGS-5, and WGS-6, the first WGS satellites in the Block II series, are shown from right to left undergoing final integration, test, and launch activities in November 2011.

Boeing received authorization from the U.S. Air Force to produce and launch the eighth and ninth Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS) satellites. WGS-8 and -9 will join four other satellites that are part of the Block II series. Block II adds a switchable radio frequency bypass that enables the transmission of airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance imagery at data rates approximately three times greater than the rates available on Block I satellites. WGS-9 is being funded through a cooperative agreement that the USAF has forged with Canada, Denmark, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and New Zealand. WGS satellites are built on the Boeing 702HP platform, which features highly efficient xenon-ion propulsion, deployable thermal radiators, and advanced triple-junction gallium-arsenide solar arrays that enable high-capacity, flexible payloads.

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