EOS wins space contract

  • 29-Aug-2011 01:43 EDT

Electro Optics Systems (EOS) has been awarded a $3 million Australian Department of Defence Concept Technology Demonstrator (CTD) contract to demonstrate that its electro-optic space surveillance sensors integrate and operate effectively with existing space surveillance sensors. In the period 2005-10, the EOS sensors, based on laser and optical technology, had demonstrated all the performance expected for next-generation space tracking requirements, except operational cost-effectiveness and the ability to operate with existing infrastructure. Since 2010 EOS has been engaged under Australian Space Research Program funding of $4.3 million to demonstrate the operational cost-effectiveness of its space surveillance sensors, principally through fully automated operation of sensors capable of long-range and accurate tracking. These operational extensions will be completed in 2012. The CTD contract will now require those sensors to be tested in real-time operations with existing space surveillance radars, to establish that new sensors can operate effectively within existing tracking infrastructure that represents many billions of dollars of investment. The CTD contract will involve the expertise of EOS and its partner Northrop Grumman to examine how EOS' Australian-based sensors could be linked to U.S.-based radar to track space objects more accurately and effectively than either system could achieve alone.

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