Sun to power Chevy Volts and dealerships

Image: ChevroletVoltGreenZone15.jp.jpg

The Al Serra Auto Plaza in Grand Blanc, MI, is one of Chevrolet’s two U.S. dealerships where installation of a solar-powered electric charging station is complete.

General Motors is installing solar-powered electric charging stations for its Volts at North American dealerships. Two dozen U.S. dealerships have pledged to install charging stations, with each one generating electricity equivalent to 12 full vehicle charges per day. Excess electricity will be used to supplement the dealerships’ power needs. Charging stations already are installed at a dealership in Michigan and one in California. The initiative is part of General Motors Ventures’ recent $7.5 million investment in Sunlogics—a solar panel manufacturing and development company that will supply the panels and install the charging stations—and GM’s promise to double its global solar output by 2015. GM claims it is currently the leading user of renewable energy in automotive manufacturing.

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